The Rants and Ravings of an Undiscovered Genius
Sexism and Superheroes, Part 2: Wonder Woman

mademoiselle-error:

My roommate is a huge fan of superheroes.

He has stacks of comics lined up on his entertainment center. His Facebook timeline is plastered with pictures of various superheroes, including the ones no one cares about (like Aquaman). And when someone brings up criticisms of the superhero genre, he is the first to defend it.

I’ll give him some credit. Superheroes are wish fulfillment escapism through and through, and they’re particularly potent wish fulfillment if you’re a nerdy, twenty-something male in search of a place to belong. I don’t even particularly have a problem with superheroes being wish fulfillment for their intended demographic. I think it’s fantastic that superheroes provide a healthy conduit for the unfulfilled desires of the male population - they serve the same purpose for men that Romantic Comedies and Princess movies serve for women.

But I don’t like how they’re beginning to monopolize movie theaters.

Yes, I’ll agree that the sexism contained within many superhero comics is a totally healthy thing given the key demographic (socially awkward males); but this sexism is extending out to other populations, and it’s totally okay. It’s not okay that I h

But I’m not going to talk about the movies right now. Let’s go back to the beginning - the first well-known female superhero still in the semi-mainstream, the sexiest, most independent motherfucker out there. She’s beautiful. She’s strong. She can save herself.

She’s Wonder Woman… and she’s also deeply, deeply sexist.

~~~~

Credit where credit is due: Wonder Woman was created in the 1950’s. Maybe all the sexism was built into her character.

She is a very strong female character. That was threatening to men, and possibly women, of the time; so in order to dilute the threatening aspect of her character, they had to sexualize her a bit. And I get that, but that hasn’t changed since the 1950’s. In fact, it only got worse.

Wonder Woman was “included” in the Justice League in 1960. I put that in quotes because she only serves as a glorified sidekick; the main leaders (Batman and Superman) take all the credit. Everything Wonder Woman does “helps” one of the main male leads… which isn’t exactly very empowering. At all.

What’s more, her design is impractical. She was supposed to be the feminine equivalent of Superman when she was created - or at least, that’s what many people believe her to be - but when you look at their costumes, you’ll see the difference glaring at you in the face.

Her long, black hair hangs in front of her face, a perfect target for the less-scrupulous villain to aim for if he really wanted to disable her. Her chest, her face, and her legs are all exposed to outside attacks. Her breasts are - LITERALLY - up to her neck in such a way that someone who actually has breasts would wonder whether they would get in the way. (And trust me, they would.) She basically wears lingerie while going into battle against people who probably want to kill her, and this is… apparently okay.

"But oh, Error, she’s wearing pants now!"

Just out of curiosity, do you listen to yourself when you speak? “Oh, you women should feel grateful that we allow your superheroic icon to wear pants” is not somehow an argument that you are less misogynistic. This isn’t that hard. And for that matter, the outrage against Wonder Woman’s pants was so vitriolic that it was hilarious. (“It goes against the traditional appearance of Wonder Woman! You’re being so PC that you’re diluting the content!”)

Yeah, no, you’re kind of assholes here.

Wonder Woman was created in the 1940s, not the 50s, did you even bother to look at her Wikipedia page, because that’s the sort of error that makes me question if you even read any of her comics before writing this.

So your main complaint seems to be that Diana doesn’t wear pants, but you’re a Sailor Moon fan and she also doesn’t wear pants so… yeah

tracylord:

 asked: Alfred Hitchcock

Favorite film: Notorious (1946)


 Natalie Wood makes a special appearance on the Bob Hope Chevy Show, 1957.
 Natalie Wood makes a special appearance on the Bob Hope Chevy Show, 1957.
slsblog:

Must I bind you?

slsblog:

Must I bind you?

soloses:

the a in lgbtqa should stand for allies, they deserve the recognition for defeating the axis powers and winning world war 2

policymic:

7 ways we can fix gender inequality other than with confidence

The most recent encouragement to just “fake it til you make it” comes from Katty Kay and Claire Shipman who published a feature on the “confidence gap” in the Atlantic. In the undoubtedly well-meaning piece, Kay and Shipman share troubling research outlining an equally gloomy picture: Women undervalue their accomplishments, and it’s holding them back in the workplace.

Although it’s true that some women suffer from more self-defeating thoughts and lower self-esteem, gender inequality can’t be reduced to mental health issues. Women’s lack of opportunities in the workplace are due to much deeper issues, and it’s time we admit that. Instead of telling women to change their personalities, maybe it’s time we take a look at the entire system.

Here’s a (non-exhaustive) list of ways we can help women that don’t include telling them just to hold their head up high. 

Read more | Follow policymic

whilecinemavisionsdancedinmyhead:

Anna Karenina (2012)

whilecinemavisionsdancedinmyhead:

Anna Karenina (2012)

fandomsandfeminism:

notkatniss:

apparently one gay superhero couple is way too much for straight people to handle

-laughs manically- 

fandomsandfeminism:

notkatniss:

apparently one gay superhero couple is way too much for straight people to handle

-laughs manically- 

theboywholikesfire:

I sorta did a thing.